second-hand books | peace and quiet | ponsonby

 

Here's to stories.

They're how we make sense of our world, how we get out of the day to day, how we remember what it used to be like, and how we make maps for our future selves.

Here's to reality.

To physical things. To actual feels. To saving our pennies. And to not getting our clickstream tracked.

Here's to humanity.

It needn't all be hustle and bustle, international brands and manufactured hospitality.

And here's to books.

The diaries of another time. A store of useful memories. A picture worth a thousand words. 

So climb into unexpected spaces. Explore new ideas. Slow down time for a minute. Or an hour.

This bookstore is a memory bank, and we're open to new borrowers. Starting from a dollar.

What we are doing

Let's face it. Second-hand bookstores are good for the soul and need to exist in the world.

We want to find ways to restore this one to sufficient commercial success to sustain its future in the Ponsonby community.

We plan to do that by making it a space where a few more things can happen than just second-hand books.

You can read more about our plans, and follow along with the story on the blog.

 

Who we are

Hayden Glass is a long-time Ponsonby resident. When he is not selling second-hand books, he works for Figure.NZ, publishing data about New Zealand for everyone to use, and as a consulting economist with the Sapere Research Group, mostly studying the economic impacts of technology. He also convenes the Moxie Sessions, a tech economy discussion group.

 

Julie Fry divides her time between Brooklyn, New York, and a family farm near Motueka. She now works as a consulting economist, having spent her earlier career in the public service in New Zealand and in London. On the blog Julie explains how she got involved with this project.

 

 

Julie and Hayden met while writing a book about the economics of immigration called Going Places. We don't stock it in our store yet sadly, but you can get it online or from good (new) bookshops.